Research in France on Homeric εὔχομαι since the publication of Leonard Muellner,…

When self-praise connects the speaker to the universe: A diachronic view of the word eukhomai (εὔχομαι) in its Homeric contexts

2021.01.20 | By Gregory Nagy Poster for Academy of Athens Seminar 2020-2021. This text, https://classical-inquiries.chs.harvard.edu/when-self-praise-connects-the-speaker-to-the-universe/, is to be read “live” on January 20, 2021, at 5:00 p.m. Athens time, as a contribution to a seminar series organized by the Academy of Athens for 2020–2021, “(Self-)Praise and (Self-) Blame in Ancient Literature” (Κέντρον Ερεύνης της Ελληνικής και Λατινικής Γραμματείας της Ακαδημίας Αθηνών, στο πλαίσιο του μηνιαίου σεμιναρίου του). My special thanks go to… Read more

A personal checklist of memorable wordings in Parts I and II of Richard P. Martin’s Mythologizing Performance

2019.04.12 | By Gregory Nagy §0. In an earlier posting, Classical Inquiries 2017.12.09, I have already expressed the intellectual debt I owe to Richard P. Martin’s book, Mythologizing Performance (Cornell University Press 2018). In the present posting, I follow up with a checklist of memorable wordings culled from Parts I and II of Martin’s book, to be followed in a later posting by a complementary checklist for Parts III and IV.… Read more

A foreword to an essay by Charles de Lamberterie

2017.11.17 | By Gregory Nagy Presented here is a preliminary draft of a foreword to an English-language version of an essay by Charles de Lamberterie. Charles de Lamberterie and Douglas Frame.   The original French-language version of “The Greek Adjective Ἄσμενος: Its Etymology and History,” an essay written by Charles de Lamberterie, appeared in a volume published in 2014 by the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres in Paris. That volume… Read more

Song 44 of Sappho revisited: what is ‘oral’ about the text of this song?

2016.08.31 | By Gregory Nagy This song, attributed to Sappho, shows the same kind of formulaic structure that we see at work in the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey. Such a structure, in the case of Homeric poetry, indicates that this poetry originated from oral traditions. So also in the case of the songmaking exemplified by Song 44 of Sappho, the formulaic structure of this song indicates a parallel origin from… Read more

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