A sampling of comments on Pausanias: 1.15.1–4

A sampling of comments on Pausanias: 1.14.1–9

2017.12.28 | By Gregory Nagy I continue from where I left off in Classical Inquiries 2017.12.21. Here on the cover page, I focus on what Pausanias says at 1.14.6 about the mystical birth of Erikhthonios. I show a painting that represents this birth as visualized in the fifth century BCE. Pictured here is the moment when the goddess Gē/Gaia, or Earth, who is the mother of Erikhthonios, is lifting her… Read more

A sampling of comments on Pausanias: 1.8.2–1.13.8

2017.12.21 | By Gregory Nagy I continue from where I left off in Classical Inquiries 2017.12.14. Here on the cover page, I focus on what Pausanias will be reporting at 1.11.1, where we read that a Greek king named Pyrrhos-son-of-Aiakidēs claimed as his ancestor, counting twenty generations backward in time, the Greek hero Pyrrhos-son-of-Achilles. I marvel at what seems to me such an intriguingly short span of time separating the… Read more

A sampling of comments on Pausanias: 1.5.1–1.8.1

2017.12.14 | By Gregory Nagy I continue from where I left off in Classical Inquiries 2017.11.30. From the end of 1.6.1 to the end of 1.8.1, there is a lengthy digression about the dynasties founded by Attalos and Ptolemy. But I will be focusing on a passage that occurs before that digression, at 1.5.4, where Pausanias makes mention of three mythological figures: they are Procne, Philomela, and Tereus (more accurately… Read more

A sampling of comments on Pausanias: 1.2.2–1.3.1

2017.11.09 | By Gregory Nagy My comments here continue from where I left off in Classical Inquiries 2017.10.18. Among the many points of interest noted by Pausanias in this stretch of text is his reference at 1.3.1 to a myth about the abduction of the beautiful young hero Kephalos by Eos, goddess of the Dawn. Eos carrying away young Kephalos (named); kalos inscription (here unseen). Belly of an Attic red-figure… Read more

A sampling of comments on Pausanias: 1.1.1–1.2.1

2017.10.19 | By Gregory Nagy My comments here continue from where I left off in Classical Inquiries 2017.10.10, revised 2017.10.14, where I focused on the first two sentences in the text of Pausanias 1.1.1. Now I start with the remainder of 1.1.1, continuing from there to 1.2.1. Among the many points of interest noted by Pausanias in this stretch of text is his mention of Antiope the Amazon at 1.2.1.… Read more

A sampling of comments on Pausanias: 1.1.1, the first two sentences

2017.10.10 (revised 2017.10.14) | By Gregory Nagy My set of comments on the first two sentences in the text of Pausanias 1.1.1 is divided into seven paragraphs, §§1–7. Among the many points of interest noted by Pausanias in these two sentences is his mention of a temple of the goddess Athena at the headland of Sounion—a mention that seems to anticipate what he will say at a later point about… Read more

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