etymology

Previewing a concise inventory of Greek etymologies, Part 3

2016.06.10 | By Olga Levaniouk In his posting of 2016.01.15, Gregory Nagy previewed A concise inventory of Greek etymologies (CIGE), to be edited by me and to be published by the Center for Hellenic Studies (chs.harvard.edu) in the online journal named Classics@, Issue 18. This first preview was followed by another one, by myself, in a posting of 2016.01.31. Both previews included a sample of entries that will feature in… Read more

Revisiting the question of etymology and essence

2016.06.02 | By Gregory Nagy When I say etymology here, I mean the procedure of reconstructing a form by way of linguistics. This procedure is expected to start from a current phase of the given form and then to move back in time to an earlier phase—ideally, all the way back to the earliest phase. In terms of the etymology of the word etymology, what linguists hope to recover by… Read more

Longinus and a theological view of Zeus as god of the sky

2016.05.05 | By Gregory Nagy A theological view of Zeus as god of the sky is evident from the Indo-European etymology of his divine name. The Greek form Zeús is derived from an Indo-European noun that linguists reconstruct as *dyeu-, which meant ‘sky’ in general and ‘bright sky’ in particular. As I will argue in this essay, such a theological view of Zeus is recognized and understood by Longinus in… Read more

Previewing a concise inventory of Greek etymologies, Part 2

2016.01.31 | By Olga Levaniouk A concise inventory of Greek etymologies (CIGE) represents an understanding of Greek—and especially Homeric—etymology as part of the formulaic system of early Greek poetry. Poetic function can be of crucial etymological importance, and, conversely, etymology can be essential for understanding poetry, especially when it comes to the Homeric lexicon. Read more

Previewing a concise inventory of Greek etymologies, Part 1: Introduction by Gregory Nagy 2016.01.15 to the shape of things to come

2016.01.15 | By Gregory Nagy The title (or, better, subtitle) in the second line here, just like other titles that sound like this, replicates the wording for the title of a work of science fiction by H. G. Wells (1933). But here the work is not science fiction but science in the European sense of the word. In the online journal named Classics@, published by the Center for Hellenic Studies… Read more