Guest Post

Helen of Troy: Unwomanly in Her Sexuality

2016.05.03 | Darah Vann Helen of Troy is a complex character who transgresses traditional female roles, making her characterization unwomanly to the point of being non-female. Helen is not merely the beauty who passively started the Trojan War, whatever her actual role in her abduction was, but she is also a symbol of the fears and anxieties non-womanly women produced. Read more

Helen’s mixed feelings for Alexander in Iliad 3: the cognitive, pragmatic, and emotional significance of third-person pronouns

2016.05.02 | Anna Bonifazi The way in which Helen recalls Alexander at Iliad 3.406–412 contributes a great deal to the cognitive and emotional characterization of the speech, and in particular to the expression of Helen’s mixed feelings towards Alexander. The speech reenactment by the Homeric performer shows a careful choice of third-person pronouns, which contribute to the depiction of Helen’s complex emotionality at that moment of the poem. Read more

Hélène et le chant rituel : « mythe » et performance poétique en Grèce archaïque (une perspective anthropologique)

2016.05.01 | By Claude Calame “In the vast treasury of the myths, the (Greek) poet chose in turn the legend more adapted to the ceremony he wanted to celebrate”—so Bruno Gentili in a study of 1966 with the title “Poeta—committente—pubblico.” The example of Helen as cause of the Trojan war through the abduction by Paris gives the best opportunity to illustrate the adaptation of the heroic narrative to the circumstances… Read more