Guest Post

A Tale of Two Elgins

2020.02.12 | By Vivian Jin In the West, the name Elgin evokes the controversial removal of the eponymous Elgin Marbles, now housed in the British Museum; however, in China, cultural memory recalls a British general under whose supervision Anglo-French troops entered the Yuanming Yuan (“Garden of Perfect Brightness,” also known as the Old Summer Palace). Although the two acts cannot be attributed to the same individual—it was the seventh Lord… Read more

A piece of the Parthenon in Washington, DC

2019.10.04 | By Ted Widmer In 2013, I spent a happy week at the Center for Hellenic Studies, where I did research on the ways in which Americans read the Odyssey in the 19th century. In my research, I was attuned to the myriad ways in which Americans remembered ancient Greece, including their tendency to misremember it, or confuse it with other civilizations. The Washington Monument offers just one of… Read more

A statue who shakes her head no

2019.06.05 | By Manon Brouillet §1. In 1966 the popular French singer Michel Polnareff reached his first audience with the song La Poupée qui fait non. A big success, the song has been translated into Italian (“Una bambolina che fa no, no, no”), Spanish (“Muñeca que hace no”), and German (“Meine Puppe sagt non”). This doll, who has never learnt to say yes, keeps shaking her head from side to… Read more

Comments on the Dog Star(s) by an Astronomer and Classicist

2019.06.02 | Introduced by Gregory Nagy The posting I wrote for Classical Inquiries 2019.05.24 was inspired by the research of my dear friend Roger Ceragioli, whose work on the Dog Star(s) is for me a perfect fusion of scientific and philological approaches. Thus I feel all the more honored and delighted that he has agreed to the posting of a response that he has written to my posting. And I find it… Read more

Fighting for survival

2019.04.12 | By Muriel Rouyer I am a professor of Political science (teaching two courses at the Harvard Kennedy School, on Global Europe and Green politics and Public Policy in a Global World). Within the space of two days, I discovered the existence of the Tree Corps, founded by Roosevelt during the New Deal in 1934 (see the accompanying pictures) and the Oath of the Ephebes, kindly revealed to me by… Read more

A Turkish Angora Cat in Paris: An insight into Catullus’ ‘Sparrow Poem’ (c. 2) arising from a Modern Greek Song

2019.03.18 | By Lucia Athanassaki This response has been inspired by Gregory Nagy’s discussion of Catullus’ famous ‘Sparrow Poem’ (c. 2) in Classical Inquiries 2018.12.13. According to Nagy, Catullus’ model was Sappho’s ‘Sparrow Song’, lost to us but not to Catullus, in which the Lesbian poet expressed her affection for her little sparrow. Taking my lead from a Modern Greek pet song, I shall explore a slightly different path, the possibility… Read more